Flowers of Scotland sent south to English hills


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Jahama Highland Estates

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A conservationist on the lookout for mountain avens in Lochaber

Seeds of alpine Arctic crops discovered broadly in Scotland might assist save near-extinct populations of the species in England’s Lake District.

Conservationists are amassing seeds of mountain avens in Lochaber and downy willow in Dumfries and Galloway.

The seeds are then propagated earlier than being planted on the slopes of Helvellyn, the third highest mountain within the Lake District.

The crops have been disappearing from this space of Cumbria.

Seeds of mountain avens are being gathered from crops rising on the Jahama Highland Estates close to Fort William.

The plant, which grows in chilly, sunny areas, has been discovered on lime-rich ridges at a top of 850m (2,800ft) on Beinn na Socaich, a mountain within the Grey Corries.

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Jahama Highland Estates

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Flowering mountain avens

Scottish Natural Heritage, Natural England and the John Muir Trust have labored with the estates’ house owners, GFG Alliance, in amassing mountain avens seeds.

It is an element of a wider venture to help susceptible alpine Arctic crops within the Lake District.

The downy willow, which was decreased to 23 remoted feminine shrubs on the Helvellyn crags, has been boosted by crops propagated from a inhabitants in Dumfries and Galloway.

Pete Barron, of the John Muir Trust, mentioned the intention was to assist surviving populations of the crops within the Lake District develop into self-sustaining.

He mentioned there have been simply two websites with mountain avens within the Lake District.

Conservationists have been helped by skilled gardeners in propagating the seeds.

Image copyright
Jahama Highland Estates

Image caption

Pete Barron says the intention of the venture is to assist make surviving websites within the Lake District develop into self-sustaining



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